LabJack T4

USB or Ethernet low cost multifunction DAQ device with up to 12 analog inputs or 16 digital I/O, 2 analog outputs (10-bit), and multiple digital counters/timers. Connect voltage or current inputs to record analog sensor measurements.

The T4 is an excellent choice for engineering students, hobbyists getting starting with data acquisition fundamentals as well as established engineering applications on a tight budget that require an industrial strength platform, comprehensive datasheets along with a proven track record of performance. 

Free GUI configuration and logging applications. 

LabJack T4 Hardware is featured in a video based DAQ Tutorial Course on TechExploration.com

Consider the LabJack T7 for applications needing 16+ bit AINs or the T7-Pro for applications requiring WiFi, a real time clock (RTC), or an auxiliary 24-bit low-speed ADC. For isolated, simultaneous or high speed, 24-bit measurements, consider the LabJack T8. 

Datasheet & Support

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Model
Regular price Sale price $245

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  • Description
  • Specs
  • Support
  • Faqs
Description
  • Description
  • Specs
  • Support
  • Faqs

Multifunction DAQ with Ethernet and USB

Choose the T4 for low cost Ethernet connectivity and the same software API as our flagship T7 device. The T4 has 4 dedicated high voltage (±10V, 12-bit resolution) as well as up to 8 configurable low voltage analog inputs (0-2.5V, 12-bit resolution). The T4 also has numerous built-in firmware features to help users accomplish most data acquisition needs.

The T4 is our lowest cost devices with Ethernet connectivity. They are also capable of stand-alone operation by running Lua scripts.
Multifunction DAQ with Ethernet and USB

Product Specs

T4 Hardware Overview

High Voltage Analog Inputs

  • 4 dedicated high voltage analog inputs (±10V, 12-bit resolution)
  • Configurable resolution settings

Flexible I/O:

  • 8 configurable low voltage analog inputs (0-2.5V, 12-bit resolution) that can function as digital I/O lines

Digital I/O:

  • 8 dedicated digital I/O lines (EIO4-EIO7 and CIO0-CIO3)

Analog Outputs:

  • 2 Analog Outputs (10-bit, 0-5 volts)
  • Additional analog outputs are possible via the LJTick-DAC

Optional Accessories:

Optional Accessories:

The CB15 is a simple screw terminal breakout for the DB15 connector.

The CB37 is a simple screw terminal breakout board for the DB37 connector. It only works with the U6 and T7 devices and can also be paired with the Mux80 for high channel application up to 84 AINs.

The Mux80 is an Analog Input Expansion board for the T7 and U6. Connected directly to the DB37 connector is can allow a single device to read up to 84 AINs.

 The RB12 Relay Board provides a convenient interface for the LabJack to industry standard relays to interface a LabJack with high voltages/currents. The RB12 relay board connects to the DB15 connector on the LabJack. Output or input 

The LJTick-Divider (LJTD) signal-conditioning module is designed to divide 2 single-ended higher voltage analog signals down to 0-2.5 volt signals.

The LJTick-DAC (LJTDAC) provides a pair of 14-bit analog outputs with a range of ±10 volts. Plugs into any digital I/O block, and thus up to 10 of these can be used per device to add 20 analog outputs.

The LJTick-InAmp (LJTIA) signal-conditioning module provides two instrumentation amplifiers ideal for low-level signals such as bridge circuits (e.g. strain gauges) and thermocouples. Each amplifier converts a differential input to single-ended.

The LJTick-RelayDriver (LJTRD) allows 2 digital I/O lines to each control a relay or other moderate load up to 50V/200mA.

The LJTick-CurrentShunt (LJTCS) signal-conditioning module is designed to convert a 4-20 mA current loop input signal into a 0.47-2.36 volt signal.

The LJTick-Proto (LJTP) consists of an 8x8 grid of holes for prototyping custom signal-conditioning modules.

What is LJM?

LJM Library

LJM is LabJack's free, cross-platform driver / library for simplifying device communication. It supports the LabJack T4 and T7 series and T8 devices.

 

Download

See the LJM installer page to download.

Documentation

See the LJM User's Guide.

Features

Cross-Platform

Support for Windows, macOS, and Linux allows for the same code to be run on different operating systems with the same results, whether it's on your Windows desktop, MacBook laptop, or Raspberry Pi running a distribution of Linux.

Supported In Multiple Languages

Written in C++ with a C API, LabJack maintains and supports wrappers for many programing languages.

 

C# .NET

using LabJack;

    ...

    int handle;
    LJM.OpenS("T7", "USB", "ANY", ref handle);

    // Read the voltage on AIN0
    double voltage;
    LJM.eReadName(handle, "AIN0", ref voltage);

    ...

 

For more LJM C# .NET code, see the C# .NET Examples page.

Some other supported languages:

LJM's API allows for easy integration into most languages. If the language you use isn't currently supported, feel free to contact us for assistance in integrating LJM into your project.

LJM Is For Any Level Of Expertise

You don't need to be familiar with Modbus to use LJM. Simply use LJM's Easy Functions for direct access to all the features your LabJack device provides.

If you do prefer to use Modbus, LJM's Raw Byte Functions provide byte-level control to manually send and receive Modbus packets.

AIN Extended Features [T-Series Datasheet]

Available AIN Extended Features

For any given AIN channel, one AIN-EF feature may be selected. AIN-EF indices:

Index  AIN-EF Name Supported Devices Performs Stream Internally?
0: None (disabled) All T-series  
1: Offset and Slope All T-series  
3: Max, Min, Avg All T-series Yes
4: Resistance All T-series  
5: Average and Threshold All T-series Yes
10: RMS Flex All T-series Yes
11: RMS Auto All T-series Yes
20: Thermocouple type E T7 only  
21: Thermocouple type J T7 only  
22: Thermocouple type K T7 only  
23: Thermocouple type R T7 only  
24: Thermocouple type T T7 only  
25: Thermocouple type S T7 only  
30: Thermocouple type C T7 only  
40: RTD PT100 All T-series  
41: RTD PT500 All T-series  
42: RTD PT1000 All T-series  
50: Thermistor using Steinhart-Hart equation All T-series  
51: Thermistor using Beta equation All T-series

Product Highlights

High Voltage Analog Inputs

The first 4 I/O lines on the LabJack T4 are dedicated high voltage analog inputs. Their voltage range is ±10V with 12 bits of resolution. For more details, look in the T4 datasheet.

Flexible I/O:

The 8 I/O lines marked as FIO4-FIO7 and EIO0-EIO3 are flexible I/O lines. This means they can be individually configured as digital input, digital output, or analog input lines. When configured as digital I/O, they can be used as general purpose 3.3V logic lines, can be configured for the timers/counters sub-system, or can be used as SPI, I2C, or other digital communication protocol lines. When configured as analog inputs, they are 0-2.5V analog inputs with up to 12 bits of resolution.

Digital I/O:

The T4 has 8 dedicated digital I/O lines marked as EIO4-EIO7 and CIO0-CIO3. These lines can be configured as general purpose 3.3V logic lines, as timers/counters, or as SPI, I2C, or other digital communication protocol lines.

Analog Outputs:

The LabJack T4 has 2 analog outputs (DAC0 and DAC1). Each analog output can be set between 0 and 5V with 10 bits of resolution.

Timers:

The T4 has multiple hardware timers that provide options such as PWM output, pulse/period timing, pulse counting, and quadrature input.

Counters:

The T4 has multiple hardware counters that can be used for detecting pin toggles.

Product Variations

OEM Versions

The T4-OEM includes the board only without the enclosure and without most through-hole components. See the OEM Versions section of the T4 datasheet for more details.

Support Resources

New to Data Acquisition (DAQ)? Not Sure Where to Start?

Talk to an experienced LabJack staff member or engineer at a mutually convenient time. Or try chatting online right now! Our engineers provide real-time live chat Monday-Friday between 9AM-11AM and 2PM-4PM Mountain Time. Click the chat bar in the bottom right of any page. Not online? Email Support@LabJack.com or call us at +1(303)942-0228

Software & Drivers

Recommended Software

Though LabJack devices can be used with a variety of software options, we recommend the following—unless you already know what software you'd like to use.

If you'd like a graphical application for device configuration or basic data collection, see the available LabJack applications.

If you'd like to write a program for custom behavior, LabJack recommends the following:

T-Series (T4, T7, T7-Pro, T8)

Windows, Linux, and macOS: LJM library (C/C++) or any LJM language wrapper.

For the full list, see the T-series software options.

How Do I Get In Contact with LabJack?

We believe written communication (live chat, email) is the best way to provide the best support. We can take a moment to research/test as needed, we can provide links to the extensive documentation on our site, we get a record of everything that was discussed, and we can easily loop in multiple engineers as needed. Of course, you are welcome to call us or schedule a consultation and we will do our best to help.

Live Chat

Hop on a live chat with the engineers who design and develop our products here in Colorado, USA. We are on chat Monday through Friday from 9-11 am and 2-4 pm, Denver time. Look for the chat bar at the bottom-right of every page at labjack.com

Contact Form

For technical questions or any other kind of question, please fill out our contact page or email us support@labjack.com

T4 Datasheet and Application Notes

Datassheet

T4 Datasheet

API

LJM Modbus Map

LJM Modbus Map - Use this tool to discover device features and while developing software to double check register types, names, and functionality.

Application Notes

Application Notes

Application Notes - In-depth detail on various DAQ topics.

Getting Started

Software

Install Software

1. Download and install the T4's installation package.

Connect T4

Connect T4

2. Connect the T4 to the computer via USB. The T4's status LED should blink at power up and then stay solid on. If Windows asks about installing new hardware, accept the defaults.

Kliping select

Run Kipling

3.Kipling is a free application installed by theT4's installation package. You should be able to find it in the Start Menu links.

Start

T4's Quickstart

4. See the T4's Quickstart page for more detailed instructions.

T4 Device FAQs

Returns & Exchanges

Return Policy

Everything LabJack sells has a 60-day money-back guarantee and 5-year warranty.  Put LabJack to the test. Evaluate our hardware, software, documentation, customer service and support.  You can request a full refund if you are not satisfied with a product for any reason. Refund requests are initiated from your LabJack account

*Please Note

LabJack does not resell any returned products. Don't worry, we also don't discard used LabJacks. Returns are earmarked for donations to STEM students, educators and student led engineering teams. 

Exchanges

Product exchanges are treated as returns and a new purchase.  Return your unwanted device for a refund, and place a new order for the device or devices that better suit your needs. 

Detailed Comparison of the Different LabJack Devices

U3 compared to U12

The U3 is newer than the U12, and in general is faster, more flexible, and less expensive.

The U3 is about half the size of the U12. The enclosure can be mounted using a couple screws or DIN rail, whereas the U12 enclosure has no mounting options.

Command/response functions on the U3 are typically 5-20 times faster than on the U12. See Section 3.1 of the U3 User's Guide compared to the U12 data rates page.

The U3 has up to 16 analog inputs compared to 8 on the U12. Any channel can be measured differentially versus any other channel. Accuracy specs are better than the U12.

The U3-LV has single-ended ranges of 0-2.4 or 0-3.6 volts, and a differential range of ±2.4 volts (pseudobipolar only). The U3-HV has 12 flexible I/O capable of those same low-voltage ranges, and 4 high-voltage analog inputs with a range of ±10 volts or -10/+20 volts. The U12 has a ±10 volt single-ended input range, and differential input ranges varying from ±20 volts to ±1 volt (all true bipolar). The circuitry used by the U12 to provide those high bipolar ranges is simple and inexpensive, but has drawbacks including relativity poor input impedance and errors which are different on every channel. There are many devices on the market now that have copied the same circuitry from the U12 and have the same drawbacks.

The U3 supports input streaming with a max rate of up to 50 ksamples/second, compared to 1.2 ksamples/second for the U12. The U3 achieves the full 12-bit resolution up to 2.5 ksamples/second, and then as speed increases the effective resolution drops to about 10 bits due to noise.

The U3 has 2 10-bit DACs as does the U12. The DACs on the U3 are derived from a regulated voltage, whereas the U12 DACs are derived from the power supply, so the U3 DACs will be more stable.

The digital I/O on the U3 use 3.3 volt logic, and are 5 volt tolerant. The U12 has 5 volt logic.

The U3 can have up to 2 timers and 2 counters. The timers have various functionality including period timing, duty cycle timing, quadrature input, pulse counting, or PWM output. The U12 has 1 counter and no timers.

The U3 has master support for SPI, I2C, and asynchronous serial protocols. The U12 does not support I2C, but does have some SPI and asynchronous support.

The U3 is supported on Windows, Linux and Mac OS X. The U12 has full support for Windows, limited support for Linux, and limited public support for the Mac.

On Windows, the U3 uses the flexible UD driver which also works with the U6 & UE9. There is a specific separate driver for the U12.

The U3 is compatible with the LJTick signal conditioning modules, whereas the U12 is not. Current ticks include:

  • LJTick-Divider (LJTD): Divides 2 single-ended higher voltage analog signals down to 0-2.5 volt signals. Install different resistors for different gain and offset.
  • LJTick-DAC (LJTDAC): Provides a pair of 14-bit analog outputs with a range of ±10 volts.  Plugs into any digital I/O block, and thus up to 10 of these can be used per U3/UE9 to add 20 analog outputs.
  • LJTick-InAmp (LJTIA): Provides two instrumentation amplifiers ideal for low-level signals such as bridge circuits (e.g. strain gauges) and thermocouples. Each amplifier converts a differential input to single-ended.
  • LJTick-RelayDriver (LJTRD): Allows 2 digital I/O lines on a U3/UE9 to each control a relay or other moderate load up to 50V/200mA.
  • LJTick-CurrentShunt (LJTCS): Converts a 4-20 mA current loop input signal into a 0.47-2.36 volt signal.
  • LJTick-Proto (LJTP): Consists of an 8x8 grid of holes for prototyping custom signal-conditioning ticks.

 

... versus UE9: (EOL)

The UE9 has all the same improvements as the U3 above, with the following additions and differences:

The UE9 is about twice the size of the U3.

The biggest difference is that the UE9 supports Ethernet communication in addition to USB. Ethernet communication uses standard TCP or UDP protocol, and supports Modbus/TCP. Ethernet speeds in command/response or stream mode are generally similar to USB speeds (see Sections 3.1 and 3.2 of the User's Guide for more information). The addition of an 802.11 WiFi bridge allows for inexpensive wireless data acquisition and control.

When using Ethernet only (not USB), the UE9 has at least 500 volts of electrical isolation.

The UE9 has 14 analog inputs and 2 analog outputs. The analog inputs and outputs on the UE9 have better accuracy, resolution, and linearity. The analog inputs are single-ended only, but the LJTick-InAmp can be used for low-level differential signals.

Each analog input can be configured individually as unipolar (four ranges from 0-5 volts to 0-0.625 volts) or true bipolar (±5 volts). Analog input resolution is 12-bits at max speed (12 us conversion time), increasing up to 16-bits at slower speeds (2.7 ms conversion time).

Maximum input stream rates range from 250 samples/second at 16-bit resolution to 50+ ksamples/second at 12-bit resolution. The UE9 has a very large 4 Mbit buffer for stream data, compared to a very small buffer on the U3.

The UE9 has up to 6 timers available compared to 2 on the U3.

The UE9-Pro has all the features of the normal UE9 with the addition of an auxiliary low-speed hi-resolution (24-bit) sigma-delta ADC. This converter takes about 125 ms per sample and provides an effective resolution of about 20-bits (18-bits noise free) over the 0-5 or ±5 volt ranges. Linearity and accuracy are also improved compared to the normal converter (which is still available on the UE9-Pro).

 

... versus U6:

The U6 is similar to a UE9 without Ethernet, but the U6 is newer and has some analog input improvements.  Some key details:

USB only.

Up to 4 timers available.

20 digital I/O (compared to 23 on the UE9).

The U6/U6-Pro analog inputs have higher resolution than the UE9/UE9-Pro in most cases.

Analog inputs are single-ended or differential, with input ranges of ±10, ±1, and ±0.1 volts.

2 Fixed Current Outputs (200/10 μA).

 

... versus T7:

The T7 is similar to a U6 and UE9, but the T7 combines the benefits of both devices, namely the high quality analog of the U6 with the advantages of Ethernet that you get from the UE9. The T7-Pro extends the advantages even further by adding WiFi.

Other improvements over the U6 and UE9 include:

Supported by our 3rd generation cross platform LJM library.

Straightforward low-level interface that uses Modbus TCP registers to access all device functionality.

Compatibility with most SCADA Modbus TCP enabled systems for both wired and wireless operation.

12 digital I/O lines can be configured for various timing/counting functionality, which we now refer to as DIO extended features. Read more in the DIO EF section of the T-series datasheet.

23 digital I/O, up from 20 on the U6.

The analog input extended feature system (AIN-EF) has the ability to do math and processing in hardware.  Calculations for things like average, RMS, and thermocouples can be done on the device.

Write Lua scripts that run on the device with or without a host computer.

Improved slot-style screw mounts on the enclosure, which makes it possible to wall mount the T7 in any orientation, and still have the ability to quickly 'un-hook' it from the screws.

 

... versus T4:

The T4 is a blend of a U3-HV and T7.  It has the form factor and I/O of the U3-HV, analog specifications very similar to the U3-HV (e.g. 12-bit analog inputs), but it has the processor of the T7 resulting in various changes compared to the U3:

  • Like all T-series devices, the T4 has Ethernet in addition to USB.
  • Add a standard WiFi bridge for inexpensive wireless data acquisition and control.
  • Supported by our 3rd generation cross platform LJM library.
  • Straightforward low-level interface that uses Modbus TCP registers to access all device functionality.
  • Compatibility with most SCADA Modbus TCP enabled systems for both wired and wireless operation.
  • 10 digital I/O lines can be configured for various timing/counting functionality, which we now refer to as DIO extended features. Read more in the DIO EF section of the T-series datasheet.
  • The analog input extended feature system (AIN-EF) has the ability to do math and processing in hardware.  Calculations for things like average and RMS can be done on the device.
  • Write Lua scripts that run on the device with or without a host computer.
  • The T4 has 4 single-ended analog inputs with +/-10V range, plus up to 8 digital I/O lines can be configured as single-ended analog inputs with 0-2.5V range.  Similar but not exactly the same as the U3 AIN system.

Can LabJack be used for Industrial Applications?

LabJack Devices:
  • Can comfortably operate within the industrial temperature range (-40°C to 85C)
  • Are capable of being mounted via DIN Rail/Snap track
  • Integrate with Voltage Dividers for 24+ Volt signals
  • NEMA 3 (or greater) enclosures recommended for any outdoor or indoor applications with dust, debris or in condensing humidity environments
  • All LabJack products are covered by our industry leading 5 year warranty
  • Have OEM Versions available for custom and embedded applications. 
  • Drawings and CAD Models Provided 
  • LabJack products are very robust, but subject to the influence of user connections.
  • LabJack is not liable for any losses, expenses or damages beyond the LabJack device itself.  See our Limitation of Liability for more details.

What Can I Do with a LabJack?

Read the output of sensors which measure voltage, current, power, temperature, humidity, wind speed, force, pressure, strain, acceleration, RPM, light intensity, sound intensity, gas concentration, position, and many more. A LabJack brings this data into a PC where it can be stored and processed as desired.

Control things like motors, lights, solenoids, relays, valves, and more.

What does 12- or 16-bit resolution mean?

What is resolution?

Resolution in this context refers to the conversion of an analog voltage to a digital value in a computer (and vice versa). A computer is a digital machine and thus stores a number as a series of ones and zeroes. If you are storing a digital 2-bit number you can store 4 different values: 00, 01, 10, or 11. Now, say you have a device which converts an analog voltage between 0 and 10 volts into a 2-bit digital value for storage in a computer. This device will give digital values as follows:

Voltage 2-Bit Digital Representation

0 to 2.5
2.5 to 5
5 to 7.5
7.5 to 10

00
01
10
11

So in this example, the 2-bit digital value can represent 4 different numbers, and the voltage input range of 0 to 10 volts is divided into 4 pieces giving a voltage resolution of 2.5 volts per bit. A 3-bit digital value can represent 8 (23) different numbers. A 12-bit digital value can represent 4096 (212) different numbers. A 16-bit digital value can represent 65536 (216) different numbers. It might occur to you at this point that a digital input could be thought of as a 1-bit analog to digital converter. Low voltages give a 0 and high voltages give a 1.

In the case of the LabJack U12, a single-ended analog input has a voltage range of -10 volts to +10 volts (20 volt total span) and returns a 12-bit value. This gives a voltage resolution of 20/4096 or 0.00488 volts per bit (4.88 mV/bit).

 

What does it mean to say a device is 12-bit, 16-bit, or 24-bit?

When you see analog input DAQ devices from various manufacturers called 12-bit, 16-bit, or 24-bit, it generally just means they have an ADC (analog to digital converter) that returns that many bits.  When an ADC chip returns 16 bits, it is probably better than a 12-bit converter, but not always.  The simple fact that a converter returns 16-bits says little about the quality of those bits.

It is hard to simply state "the resolution" of a given device. What we like to do, is provide actual measured data that tells you the resolution of a device including typical inherent noise.

If you look at a device called "24-bit" just because it has a converter that returns 24-bits of data per sample, you will find that it typically provides 20 bits effective or 18 bits error-free (like the UE9-Pro).  The U6-Pro and T7-Pro provide some of the best performance around from a 24-bit ADC, and they do about 22 bits effective or 20 bits error-free.  You will see with these devices we might mention they have a 24-bit ADC (as that is what people look and search for), but we try not to call them "24-bit" and try to stick with the effective resolution.

Another interesting thing about your typical 24-bit sigma-delta converter, is that you can look at them as only having a 1-bit ADC inside, but with timing and math they can produce 24-bit readings:


https://www.maximintegrated.com/en/design/technical-documents/tutorials/1/1870.html


Additional Information

Additional device-specific resolution information can be found in the respective device datasheet:

U3 Resolution

U6 Resolution

UE9 Resolution

T4 Resolution

T7 Resolution

Why LabJack?

Legendary Support

  • Email responses that actually answer your question.
  • Free lifetime support includes (some) engineering design help.
  • The engineers who made the product also respond to your questions.
  • Should your LabJack misbehave, we offer free RMA diagnostics & repairs.

 

Flexibility

  • Software integrates easily. We don't force you into a certain software, programming environment or operating system.
    • LabVIEW, C++, MATLAB, Python, Java, .NET, Delphi, Visual Basic, VB6, VBA, and more examples
    • Linux, macOS, Windows
  • Add new kinds of sensors on-the-fly. We provide inexpensive signal conditioning modules.
  • Control valves, motors, lights, pumps, etc - using one of many digital I/O control options.
  • Incorporate LabJack DAQ hardware using our OEM options.

Solutions over Show

  • Our engineers speak directly.
    • Just the information you need to make an informed choice.
    • No marketing fluff, no empty promises
  • Fair prices, nothing hidden, no extended warranties, no salesmen, no haggling, no pressure.
  • We are an independent small business in Colorado who only answers to YOU our customer 

 LabJack Team Photo

What Type of Sensors Can I Connect to LabJack?

LabJack hardware can be connected to nearly any analog or digital sensor. Of course some sensors are easier than others to connect. If you haven't yet purchased your sensors please check out our App Notes for detailed guides and best practices. Generally the best sensors output an analog voltage in the 0-10v DC range. We have many signal conditioning modules we refer to as "Ticks" that make it easy to accept other signals and ranges

What is LJM?

LJM Library

LJM is LabJack's free, cross-platform driver / library for simplifying device communication. It supports the LabJack T4 and T7 series and T8 devices.

 

Download

See the LJM installer page to download.

Documentation

See the LJM User's Guide.

Features

Cross-Platform

Support for Windows, macOS, and Linux allows for the same code to be run on different operating systems with the same results, whether it's on your Windows desktop, MacBook laptop, or Raspberry Pi running a distribution of Linux.

Supported In Multiple Languages

Written in C++ with a C API, LabJack maintains and supports wrappers for many programing languages.

 

C# .NET

using LabJack;

    ...

    int handle;
    LJM.OpenS("T7", "USB", "ANY", ref handle);

    // Read the voltage on AIN0
    double voltage;
    LJM.eReadName(handle, "AIN0", ref voltage);

    ...

 

For more LJM C# .NET code, see the C# .NET Examples page.

Some other supported languages:

LJM's API allows for easy integration into most languages. If the language you use isn't currently supported, feel free to contact us for assistance in integrating LJM into your project.

LJM Is For Any Level Of Expertise

You don't need to be familiar with Modbus to use LJM. Simply use LJM's Easy Functions for direct access to all the features your LabJack device provides.

If you do prefer to use Modbus, LJM's Raw Byte Functions provide byte-level control to manually send and receive Modbus packets.

How Do I Get In Contact with LabJack?

We believe written communication (live chat, email) is the best way to provide the best support. We can take a moment to research/test as needed, we can provide links to the extensive documentation on our site, we get a record of everything that was discussed, and we can easily loop in multiple engineers as needed. Of course, you are welcome to call us or schedule a consultation and we will do our best to help.

Live Chat

Hop on a live chat with the engineers who design and develop our products here in Colorado, USA. We are on chat Monday through Friday from 9-11 am and 2-4 pm, Denver time. Look for the chat bar at the bottom-right of every page at labjack.com

Contact Form

For technical questions or any other kind of question, please fill out our contact page or email us support@labjack.com

What is the meaning of Data Acquisition?

DAQ is short for data acquisition which is short for data acquisition and control.  The term describes the process of acquiring readings from sensors and transducers (temperature, pressure, strain, etc.), and controlling actuators (relays, solenoids, etc.).  In our case the emphasis is on computer-based DAQ, where the LabJack is the interface that allows a computer to read from sensors and control actuators.

DAQ Definition: What Is A DAQ System?

DAQ is short for data acquisition which is short for data acquisition and control.  The term describes the process of acquiring readings from sensors and transducers (temperature, pressure, strain, etc.), and controlling actuators (relays, solenoids, etc.).  In our case the emphasis is on computer-based DAQ, where the LabJack is the interface that allows a computer to read from sensors and control actuators.

 

What is an analog input? (AI, AIN, ADC)

AI or AIN = Analog Input
ADC = Analog to Digital Converter

An analog input converts a voltage level into a digital value that can be stored and processed in a computer. Why would you want to measure voltages? There are a multitude of sensors available which convert things like temperature, pressure, etc. into voltages.  The voltages can then be easily measured by various kinds of hardware, such as a LabJack U3-HV, and then read into a computer.  The computer can then convert the voltage value into it's original type (temperature, pressure, etc) and the value can then be stored in a file, emailed to someone, or used to control something else outside of the computer.

Example:

Analog Input Example

Get temperature from a sensor using an analog input.

  1. Wire the output of the analog temperature sensor to a U3-HV as shown.
  2. Read the voltage on the computer to know the current temperature. 
  3. This particular sensor outputs 0.01 volts per °F, so 0.76V corresponds with 76°F.

Explore LabJack's Analog Input App Note

How Can I Get a Free LabJack Shirt or Hat?

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T4 Tech Specs

Low cost USB and Ethernet

T4 Tech Specs

Flexible, Configurable I/0

8 configurable low voltage analog inputs (0-2.5V, 12-bit resolution) that can function as digital I/O lines

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Multiple Connectivity Options

USB or Ethernet ports make getting started fast and easy

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Powerful Processor

T-Series devices can execute Lua code to allow custom, independent operation. A Lua script can be used to collect data without a host computer or be used to perform complex tasks producing simple results that a host can read.

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Convenient Adapters

Easily Connect "Ticks" for a variety of signal conditioning needs

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DB15 Connector

Access all I/O with the CB15 Terminal or use your own DB15 Adapter

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